yoke

yoke
yoke [yōk]
n.
pl. yokes or yoke [ME yok < OE geoc, akin to Ger joch < IE * yugo- (> Sans yuga, L jungere, jugum, Gr zeugma, Welsh iau, OSlav igo) < base * yeu-, to join]
1. a wooden frame or bar with loops or bows at either end, fitted around the necks of a pair of oxen, etc. for harnessing them together
2. a pair of animals harnessed together [a yoke of oxen]
3.
a) a device symbolizing a yoke, as an arch of spears, under which the conquered were forced to pass in ancient times
b) any mark or symbol of bondage or servitude
c) subjection; bondage; servitude
4. something that binds, unites, or connects [the yoke of matrimony]
5. something like a yoke in shape or function; specif.,
a) a frame fitting over the shoulders for carrying pails, etc., one on either end
b) a clamp, coupling, slotted piece, etc. used to hold two parts together
c) the crosspiece to which the steering cables are attached on a ship's rudder
d) the bar used in double harnessing to connect the horse's collar to the tongue of the wagon or carriage
6. a part of a garment fitted closely to the shoulders, as of a dress, or to the hips, as of a skirt, as a support for gathered parts
7. Elec. a piece of magnetic material, without windings, that permanently connects two or more magnet cores
8. Electronics an assembly of coils and magnetic material placed about the neck of a cathode-ray tube to provide electromagnetic deflection fields for the electron beam
vt.
yoked, yoking
1. to put a yoke on
2. to harness (an animal) to (a plow, etc.)
3.
a) to join together; link
b) to join in marriage
4. Rare to enslave
vi.
to be joined together or closely united
SYN.- PAIR

English World dictionary. . 2014.

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  • YOKE — (Heb. עוֹל). In the Bible The yoke was usually made from a circular wooden halter which was placed on the animal s neck, and harnessed to a plow, cart, or other vehicle. Pegs, two on each side, with the neck of the animal between them, were… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Yoke — (y[=o]k), n. [OE. yok, [yogh]oc, AS. geoc; akin to D. juk, OHG. joh, G. joch, Icel. & Sw. ok, Dan. aag, Goth. juk, Lith. jungas, Russ. igo, L. jugum, Gr. zy gon, Skr. yuga, and to L. jungere to join, Gr. ?, Skr. yui. [root]109, 280. Cf. {Join},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Yoke — Yoke, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Yoked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Yoking}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To put a yoke on; to join in or with a yoke; as, to yoke oxen, or pair of oxen. [1913 Webster] 2. To couple; to join with another. Be ye not unequally yoked with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yoke — ► NOUN 1) a wooden crosspiece that is fastened over the necks of two animals and attached to a plough or cart that they pull in unison. 2) (pl. same or yokes) a pair of yoked animals. 3) a frame fitting over the neck and shoulders of a person,… …   English terms dictionary

  • Yoke — Yoke, v. i. To be joined or associated; to be intimately connected; to consort closely; to mate. [1913 Webster] We ll yoke together, like a double shadow. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yoke — yoke, yolk A yoke is a wooden crosspiece of the kind fixed over the necks of work animals. A yolk is the yellow part of an egg (and is related to the word yellow) …   Modern English usage

  • yoke — [n] bondage, bond burden, chain, coupling, enslavement, helotry, knot, ligament, ligature, link, nexus, oppression, peonage, serfdom, service, servility, servitude, slavery, tie; concepts 513,677 yoke [v] bond together; join associate, attach,… …   New thesaurus

  • yoke — index bondage, curb, fetter, incorporate (include), join (bring together), lock, subjection …   Law dictionary

  • yoke — *couple, pair, brace …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Yoke — For other uses, see Yoke (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Egg yolk. Withers yoke A yoke is a wooden beam, normally used between a pair of oxen or other animals to enable them to pull together on a load when working in pairs, as oxen… …   Wikipedia

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